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The Resource The storm, Margriet de Moor ; translated by Carol Brown Janeway

The storm, Margriet de Moor ; translated by Carol Brown Janeway

Label
The storm
Title
The storm
Statement of responsibility
Margriet de Moor ; translated by Carol Brown Janeway
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • dut
  • eng
Summary
On the night of January 31, 1953, a mountain of water, literally piled up out of the sea by a freak winter hurricane, swept down on the Netherlands, demolishing the dikes protecting the country and wiping a quarter of its landmass from the map. It was the worst natural disaster to strike the Netherlands in three hundred years. The author interweaves the stories of two sister, deftly alternating between the cataclysm and the long years of its grief-strewn aftermath
Member of
Review
  • A laborious translation doesn’t help to recommend this otherwise gripping story of dueling Dutch sisters who become separated by a monstrous meteorological anomaly. Lidy takes her sister Armanda’s place on a group trip that ends with a final stand against the legendary New Year’s storm of 1953 that swallowed a large chunk of Holland, killing nearly 2,000. Lidy’s efforts to stay alive span the better part of this saga, and that’s a good thing: de Moor is at her strongest describing the raging elements and Lidy’s traveling partners’ final hours in a farmhouse attic; the arresting details suck the reader into the maelstrom as inexorably as any of the protagonists. While it’s difficult to tell whether the prose’s lack of fluidness is simply de Moor’s style or an aspect of the translation (“Cathrien Padmos began to breathe heavily for the third time in her married life, or to put it more precisely, the cervix was in its last stages of dilation”), her methodical writing is well suited to the story’s technical aspects, of which there are many. Despite some rocky moments—events are set in motion by “a concatenation of different circumstances”—de Moor (The Kreutzer Sonata ) pulls off an involving saga of death foretold. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed November 9, 2009) (Publishers Weekly, vol 256, issue 45, p27)
  • /* Starred Review */ Readers in America may not know about the tremendous winter hurricane that hit the Netherlands in 1953, overwhelming dikes not maintained since before World War II. In the tsunami-like surge, 2000 drowned. This novel by master storyteller de Moor (The Kreutzer Sonata ) starts with an intriguing premise: two sisters, Lidy and Armanda, who look so much alike that people think of them as interchangeable, swap duties for a weekend. Headstrong Armanda proposes sending Lidy in her place to a family event on the rural Dutch coast, while Armanda stays in Amsterdam and goes to a party. Lidy finds herself running headlong into the unpredicted storm. De Moor carefully interplays the two narratives; Lidy's horrifying ordeal in the storm is clocked almost minute by minute, while the story of Armanda's and Lidy's husbands' lives, wracked by survivor's guilt, unfold over the years. Depictions of Lidy's experiences in the monster storm are terrifying in their realism; knowing she is doomed doesn't lessen the tension. VERDICT Aspects of this novel recall Sebastian Junger's The Perfect Storm , but this powerful fictional account of facing death and living with loss cuts closer to the bone. Highly recommended for fans of quality fiction.—Reba Leiding, James Madison Univ. Libs., Harrisonburg, VA --Reba Leiding (Reviewed December 15, 2009) (Library Journal, vol 134, issue 20, p96)
  • /* Starred Review */ This fifth translated novel from the Dutch classical singer-turned-novelist (The Kreutzer Sonata, 2005, etc.) offers a moving dramatization of a historical catastrophe which bears disturbing resemblances to recent global occurrences.In the winter of 1953, hurricane-driven flood waters rushing in from the North Sea destroyed dikes and obliterated an entire province in the southwestern Netherlands—a territory which "lay embedded between two arms of the sea that did what arms usually do: they move." De Moor observes this disaster from the juxtaposed viewpoints of two sisters—young wife and mother Lidy and her virginal younger sibling Armanda. When Armanda offers to take Lidy's two-year-old daughter Nadja to a party, in exchange for Lidy's appearance at a similar event held for Armanda's godchild—for the sisters resemble each other so closely, few people can tell them apart—they also exchange destinies. Lidy travels to the imminently endangered seaside town of Zierkezee, while Armanda becomes companion for the day to Nadja and her father (and Lidy's husband) Sjoerd. De Moor's laconic, precisely descriptive prose (memorably captured in Janeway's pristine translation) pinpoints numerous indications of what is to come (e.g., the curious phenomenon of hares running alongside cars on a well-traveled highway) and what later occurs (e.g., the sighting of "a farmhouse that…no longer stood in the middle of fields or meadows but in an ocean current"). As Lidy's ordeal, presented in piecemeal fragments of hard-won momentary stays against extinction, approaches its end, Armanda, Sjoerd and Nadja—both during the storm and for years afterward—grasp at whatever forms of enduring and persevering rise up before them. And de Moor brings this harrowing story to a stunning climax, as Armanda, an old woman kept alive by little more than her memories, in effect dreams a long conversation with the beloved sister whose life she has inadvertently appropriated and whose sufferings she has grown and learned to share.It's hard to resist using the word "symphonic" to describe this exquisitely composed, piercingly moving story. De Moor continues to scale increasingly impressive heights. (Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2010)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
338740
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1941-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moor, Margriet de
Dewey number
839.3/1364
Index
no index present
Literary form
novels
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Janeway, Carol Brown
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Storm surges
  • Sisters
  • Disaster victims
Label
The storm, Margriet de Moor ; translated by Carol Brown Janeway
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
  • Originally published in the Netherlands as De Verdronkene in 2005
  • Translated from the Dutch
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First American edition.
Extent
x, 257 pages
Isbn
9780307264947
Isbn Type
(hd.cov.)
Lccn
2009037578
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
  • (OCoLC)419798204
  • ocn419798204
  • OCoLC
Label
The storm, Margriet de Moor ; translated by Carol Brown Janeway
Publication
Copyright
Note
  • Originally published in the Netherlands as De Verdronkene in 2005
  • Translated from the Dutch
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
25 cm
Edition
First American edition.
Extent
x, 257 pages
Isbn
9780307264947
Isbn Type
(hd.cov.)
Lccn
2009037578
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
System control number
  • (OCoLC)419798204
  • ocn419798204
  • OCoLC

Library Locations

    • Bluebonnet Regional Branch LibraryBorrow it
      9200 Bluebonnet Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA, 70810, US
      30.365310 -91.105254
    • Main LibraryBorrow it
      7711 Goodwood Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA, 70806, US
      30.443886 -91.107152
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